Something simple at first glance but very very good lighting practice.

Lighting is hard. Very hard. So, they say one way of learning it is to re-create photographs and that is what I did with this thing right here.
The white parts of the balls required a little more work to look right. I ended up using a glossy material mixed with a scattering volume… and on top of that a glossy coating layer covering the whole ball.
The fuzzy look of the table carpet was achieved by using a lot of small scale displacement on a plane underneath the carpet and then placing it so the bumps just barely clip through the carpet.

Download .blend file.
36MB, modeling: Blender 2.78, rendering: LuxRender.




Creating a Jade Material

A jade rock  material can be rendered with LuxRender by using a volume. It supports three types of volumes each of them with their own strengths and weaknesses. This jade pendant is using a heterogeneous volume, which is slower to render than the other two types, but using it you are able to get some very interesting-looking  volumes.

The volume color is created by mixing together several procedural textures. Procedurals being as flexible are they are, you can create just about any look you want.


jade tutorial 2 final

Abstract Wallpaper

These are very fun to make because you can just make it up as you go. The only goal I had for this one was something dark and creepy. It is somewhat similar to my previous abstracts, in the way that something is emitting light(energy) and something else wants to absorb it. I figured some insect things with solar catching abilities would do the trick. And maybe these could be some spider like things that could easily traverse this environment.
So, some eight-legged insects with solar catching features. These exist everywhere, right?

It is a wallpaper so some space is left clear on purpose for the icons.
And no, it doesn’t mean anything. It’s abstract. It’s supposed to be weird.

Download .blend file
22MB, rendering; LuxRender, modeling: Blender, texturing: Substance Painter

abstract wallpaper


Hair and Fur

LuxRender supports a strand primitive allowing hair and fur to be rendered with hundreds of thousands of strands. It uses Blender’s hair particle system and creates the strand geometry based on that. You can choose between four different strand types depending on the look you want and four different ways to put color on the strands.



Volumetric Scattering

Volumetric scattering is pretty simple to set up in LuxRender. When all materials/objects are inside the volume that makes it super-easy when you can use the scattering volume as the default volume, which makes LuxRender use that volume on all materials/objects.
Keeping track of the face normal is important when picking the exterior or interior volume for a material.





The Landwasserschlepper was an amphibious tractor built by the Germans in the 1940’s. Its purpose was to pull stuff across seas and rivers as well as on land. Indeed a very interesting vehicle design smile

As cool as the 1940’s design is by itself, I wanted a little comical look to it. The boat hull is way shorter than the original and I wanted some exaggerated tank tracks for no reason at all. Those changes made the scale of things look wrong. Everything is modeled to scale, it’s actually the vehicle that is smaller than it looks.

Download .blend file
108MB, Rendering: LuxRender, Modeling: Blender, Texturing: Substance Painter

Right-click and view image to see full res.

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Hotel Lobby

This is a scene from 2014 which I forgot to upload here, for some reason. It was made for the GPU benchmarking program LuxMark.
The goal was to create a scene for the heavy benchmark category with about 5 million faces. Architecture seemed like a nice challenge so I based the scene on the Renaissance Sanya Resort & Spa in China.
Also the scene is lit by only one light source, the sun, because I wanted that challenge for an interior scene.

Download .blend file
41MB, modeling: Blender 2.77, rendering: LuxRender 1.6, texturing: Gimp

Hotel Lobby