Hair and Fur

LuxRender supports a strand primitive allowing hair and fur to be rendered with hundreds of thousands of strands. It uses Blender’s hair particle system and creates the strand geometry based on that. You can choose between four different strand types depending on the look you want and four different ways to put color on the strands.

http://www.luxrender.net/wiki/Setting_up_hair_and_fur

hair-and-fur


Volumetric Scattering

Volumetric scattering is pretty simple to set up in LuxRender. When all materials/objects are inside the volume that makes it super-easy when you can use the scattering volume as the default volume, which makes LuxRender use that volume on all materials/objects.
Keeping track of the face normal is important when picking the exterior or interior volume for a material.

http://www.luxrender.net/wiki/Setting_up_volumetric_scattering

work-light-in-scattering-volume

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Landwasserschlepper

The Landwasserschlepper was an amphibious tractor built by the Germans in the 1940’s. Its purpose was to pull stuff across seas and rivers as well as on land. Indeed a very interesting vehicle design smile

As cool as the 1940’s design is by itself, I wanted a little comical look to it. The boat hull is way shorter than the original and I wanted some exaggerated tank tracks for no reason at all. Those changes made the scale of things look wrong. Everything is modeled to scale, it’s actually the vehicle that is smaller than it looks.

Download .blend file
108MB, Rendering: LuxRender, Modeling: Blender, Texturing: Substance Painter

Right-click and view image to see full res.

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Hotel Lobby

This is a scene from 2014 which I forgot to upload here, for some reason. It was made for the GPU benchmarking program LuxMark.
The goal was to create a scene for the heavy benchmark category with about 5 million faces. Architecture seemed like a nice challenge so I based the scene on the Renaissance Sanya Resort & Spa in China.
Also the scene is lit by only one light source, the sun, because I wanted that challenge for an interior scene.

Download .blend file
41MB, modeling: Blender 2.77, rendering: LuxRender 1.6, texturing: Gimp

Hotel Lobby

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Two of Spades

Something simple and quick.

Ensiferum – Two of Spades. Track 8, on this album

Download .blend file
7MB, modeling: Blender 2.77, rendering: LuxRender 1.6, texturing: Substance Painter

two of spades

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The Twister

Way back in 1997, a game was released upon the world that would set new standards for vehicle racing games. Featuring open world racing, new at the time, there was no need for boring linear racing between checkpoints. You could drive to the next checkpoint any which way you wanted. Actually, there was no need for checkpoints in the first place. There were multiple ways to win a race and one of them was to wreck your opponents’ cars, and that was a lot more fun.
I was fascinated by the vehicle physics and the car damage system the game had. Even today, I still enjoy it. The game was Carmageddon. This is one of the cars in that game.

The game got a reboot with Carmageddon: Max Damage in 2016, taking vehicle damage system to an insane new level and a lot cooler looking cars (and hires too).
Stainless did not disappoint. It is a monster and it follows the same gorgeous vehicular combat/racing type as Carmageddon (1997). The Twister is available in Max Damage too, but I wanted to stay true to the original, creating a somewhat real-looking version based on a low poly game car.

Rendering done with LuxRender.
Concrete textures, parking lines and oil spills from plaintextures. The rest are created in Substance Painter.
Carmageddon (1997) is available in its original low poly glory at GOG

Carmageddon ©  Stainlessgames

Download .blend file
40MB, modeling: Blender 2.76, rendering: LuxRender 1.6

Right-click and ‘view image’ to see full res.

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Desert Vehicle

A lightweight and fast desert buggy with a little futuristic look. Intended for fast and fun driving across sand dunes. Built by using whatever material there was available and by using as little as possible of it. The vehicle comes with some space left for salvaging things (deserts can be big, you never know what you might find out there).
Includes sturdy foam tires, because rubber is old-school and deflates easily. Foam parts can easily be replaced if needed.

I so wanted to have a desert scene for this guy but I could not get it to look right. After several attempts I finally gave up and put him in a studio scene instead because I really wanted to finish him. I might revisit it later.
You can right-click the slideshow below to see the images in full resolution.

Textures: Substance Painter and Gimp
Rendering: LuxRender
Modeling: Blender

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