Two of Spades

Something simple and quick.

Ensiferum – Two of Spades. Track 8, on this album

Download .blend file
7MB, modeling: Blender 2.77, rendering: LuxRender 1.6, texturing: Substance Painter

two of spades

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The Twister

Way back in 1997, a game was released upon the world that would set new standards for vehicle racing games. Featuring open world racing, new at the time, there was no need for boring linear racing between checkpoints. You could drive to the next checkpoint any which way you wanted. Actually, there was no need for checkpoints in the first place. There were multiple ways to win a race and one of them was to wreck your opponents’ cars, and that was a lot more fun.
I was fascinated by the vehicle physics and the car damage system the game had. Even today, I still enjoy it. The game was Carmageddon. This is one of the cars in that game.

The game got a reboot with Carmageddon: Max Damage in 2016, taking vehicle damage system to an insane new level and a lot cooler looking cars (and hires too).
Stainless did not disappoint. It is a monster and it follows the same gorgeous vehicular combat/racing type as Carmageddon (1997). The Twister is available in Max Damage too, but I wanted to stay true to the original, creating a somewhat real-looking version based on a low poly game car.

Rendering done with LuxRender.
Concrete textures, parking lines and oil spills from plaintextures. The rest are created in Substance Painter.
Carmageddon (1997) is available in its original low poly glory at GOG

Carmageddon ©  Stainlessgames

Download .blend file
40MB, modeling: Blender 2.76, rendering: LuxRender 1.6

Right-click and ‘view image’ to see full res.

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Desert Vehicle

A lightweight and fast desert buggy with a little futuristic look. Intended for fast and fun driving across sand dunes. Built by using whatever material there was available and by using as little as possible of it. The vehicle comes with some space left for salvaging things (deserts can be big, you never know what you might find out there).
Includes sturdy foam tires, because rubber is old-school and deflates easily. Foam parts can easily be replaced if needed.

I so wanted to have a desert scene for this guy but I could not get it to look right. After several attempts I finally gave up and put him in a studio scene instead because I really wanted to finish him. I might revisit it later.
You can right-click the slideshow below to see the images in full resolution.

Textures: Substance Painter and Gimp
Rendering: LuxRender
Modeling: Blender

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RoboCop 2

I have always been fascinated by the design of RoboCop 2: detailed like crazy, powerful, sturdy and unbreakable. He looks like he could withstand anything.

Needless to say, the work on this guy has been a long-term project. I ended up putting in countless hours on him, but I do not regret it. He truly is the most bad ass thing ever created for film. Tippet Studio really did create an unimaginable piece of machinery. Fantastic work, you guys!
You can right-click the slide show and click show image or similar to view it full res.
RoboCop © Orion pictures.

Modeling and rigging: Blender
Rendering: LuxRender
Texturing: Substance Painter

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Camera Obscura

OK, so what is this?
This is a proof-of-concept render using the camera obscura technique. The scene is a closed room except for a very small hole in the back wall. Light rays travel in a straight line but because the hole is so small it will actually project an upside-down image on the wall. Wikipedia article.Camera_obscura_public_domain
The cool thing is that you can actually do this in real life.

This render was just a test to see if LuxRender could do it and it worked nicely. Idea originally by user pnn32 on DeviantArt.

Rendering: LuxRender 1.51
Modeling: Blender 2.75
Hdr image from openfootage.net

camera obscura

Creative Commons License


Mark IV World War 1 tank

The Germans dug wider trenches to stop the new moving metal monsters called “tanks” in 1914. So the English extended the rear of the tanks with this “tad pole” version to be able to cross the trenches. Sadly this guy was engineered together in the end of the war and did not get to see battle. The war was over before he got put to use.
I really like the design of this guy. It’s long and weird, and looks more powerful and dangerous than the shorter regular Mark IV tanks.

The 3d model is on sale at Blender Market.

Rendering: LuxRender 1.5   modeling: Blender 2.74   texturing: Substance Painter

Mark_IV_image_1 alt

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Creative Commons License


Dragon

This one is based on Shanol‘s excellent original character. I really liked the character’s look with the thin body and the long legs. So I used his character as base and tried to make a dragon out of it. It turned out way more evil looking than I had planned, but you know, things change.

I tried several different materials, mostly variations of a much lighter and more translucent (and less evil) material, but as soon as I tried this darker one it was like, “Yep, this is the one”. I used only procedural textures and they were a lot of fun to mix together, even though it got messy with all the nodes in the end. 2.3 million triangles in total.

Blender used for sculpting and LuxRender for rendering.

dragon

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